Lectures

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Saturday, March 24, 2018, 2 p.m.
New Hampshire Heritage Lecture: New Hampshire Heritage Lecture: The Company That Built Manchester

The creation and growth of Manchester, which today is the largest city in Northern New England, is primarily the legacy of one entity: the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company. This lecture, presented by Jeffrey Barraclough, director of operations at the Manchester Historic Association, will look at the origins of Amoskeag, how it developed, and its lasting legacy, which extended long past the company’s closing in 1935. It will also look at the founding of the Manchester Historic Association and how it became a repository for the history of the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company. The New Hampshire Heritage Lecture series highlights the stories behind the state’s many historic and cultural attractions. This program is included in the price of admission to the Society.

Thursdays, April 12, 19, 26, May 3, 10, 2018, 6 p.m.
Spring Lecture Series: Natural Disasters in the Granite State

Natural disasters have marked New Hampshire and its people throughout the centuries. In the wake of these catastrophes, Granite Staters have had to marshal all their characteristic Yankee ingenuity to rebuild and go on, but disasters have also served as catalysts for great change in the state, whether clearing the way for a new industry or compelling increased government action in the management of the state’s resources. At heart, though, these tragedies have served to remind people of the power of nature and our reliance on the land we call New Hampshire. This five-lecture series will include talks on the year without a summer (by historian Howard Coffin), the Willey Slide (by Professor Marcia Schmidt Blaine), the 20 most significant storms that changed the state (by WMUR meteorologist Kevin Skarupa), the 1903 fires in the White Mountains (by forester David Govatski), and the hurricane of 1938 (by author Stephen Long). This series is free for New Hampshire Historical Society members, but space is limited and registration is required. Nonmembers are welcome to attend for a fee of $50, which includes a one-year membership to the Society. Register online through Eventbrite; mail the registration form with payment; or call the New Hampshire Historical Society’s Member and Visitor Services Coordinator Wendy Olcott at 603-856-0621 to register by phone and pay with a credit card.

Saturday, April 14, 2018, 2 p.m.
New Hampshire Heritage Lecture: The Dunlap Broadside and American Independence

Only 26 copies of the Dunlap Broadside, the first official printing of the Declaration of Independence, exist in the world, and the American Independence Museum in Exeter has one. Join Emma Bray, the museum’s executive director, to learn how this small museum in a small town ended up with such an important document, why Exeter celebrates Independence Day in mid-July, and how the re-discovery of this document led to the creation of the museum in 1991. The New Hampshire Heritage Lecture series highlights the stories behind the state’s many historic and cultural attractions. This program is included in the price of admission to the Society. This program is included in the price of admission to the Society.

Contact

Jennifer Walton
Education & Public Programs Coordinator
603-856-0645
jwalton@nhhistory.org

Contact