Programs & Events Calendar

All in-person programs will be held at the New Hampshire Historical Society, 30 Park Street, Concord, unless otherwise noted.

Lecture: “Late in Arriving: How Electricity Changed Rural New Hampshire,” by Steve Taylor *FREE*
Saturday, February 24, 2024, 2 p.m.

Many people in rural New Hampshire did not have access to the transformative benefits of electric power until World War II. For thousands of households, the introduction of electricity meant relief from the drudgery of the wood-fueled cookstove, the washboard, and the kerosene lamp. Presenter Steve Taylor will explore how these developments changed civic and social life in New Hampshire’s countryside. This lecture is offered through the Humanities to Go program of New Hampshire Humanities, and admission is free. No registration required.

Virtual Lecture: “A Recipe for Success: Finding Women through Community Cookbooks,” by Erin Moulton
Wednesday, February 28, 2024, 7 p.m.

Community and church cookbooks are treasures that give us a glimpse of female social networks, encapsulated in a place and time. Besides providing delicious treats, these recipe books can also be a springboard to genealogical adventure. Join librarian and researcher Erin Moulton in this virtual lecture as she looks at recipes and the women who created them. Admission is free for New Hampshire Historical Society members; $5 for nonmembers. Register through Eventbrite.

Granite State Stories: Part 2
Saturday, March 2, 2024, 2 p.m.

In honor of the New Hampshire Historical Society’s 200th anniversary in 2023, Society staff have been touring the state and sharing a collection of stories that capture the iconic spirit of New Hampshire. After visiting libraries and local historical societies around the Granite State, we’re bringing this event back to the Society itself. Each of these Granite States Stories programs held at the Society this winter and spring will feature two different topics. This second talk in the series will explore the tales of the Society’s rare Revolutionary War flags and the circa 1870 John Badger Bachelder painting depicting the Battle of Gettysburg. Admission is free for New Hampshire Historical Society members; $7 for nonmembers. No registration required.

Virtual Workshop: Creating a History Scavenger Hunt
Wednesday, March 6, 2024, 7 to 9 p.m.

In the summer of 2023, the New Hampshire Historical Society organized a statewide scavenger hunt that got Granite Staters out of doors and exploring the state and its history. Dubbed the 603 History Hunt, it garnered attention from major media outlets in the region and introduced hundreds of people to the organization and its work. Join Society staffer Mary Adams, one of the key members of the 603 History Hunt team, to learn more about how to create and manage a scavenger hunt for your own group. Discover tricks and tips to save money and time in developing a program that will inspire your entire community. The charge for this virtual workshop, co-sponsored by the Association of Historical Societies of New Hampshire (AHSNH), is $20 for members of either the New Hampshire Historical Society or the AHSNH; $35 for nonmembers. Register through Eventbrite.

Book Talk: Monadnock Originals, Colorful Characters from New Hampshire’s Quiet Corner, by Alan Rumrill *FREE*
Saturday, March 9, 2024, 2 p.m.

Often referred to as New Hampshire’s quiet corner, the Monadnock Region is known for its historic villages and beautiful natural landscape. But it has not always been quiet. Join Alan Rumrill, director of the Historical Society of Cheshire County, for a glimpse into his new book, Monadnock Originals, which shares stories of fame, fortune, and scandal, as well as of the Yankee characters who have given the region its personality. Copies of Rumrill’s book will be available for purchase. This is a free program; no registration required.

Virtual Lecture: “Diplomats at Sea: Junior Officers of the U.S. Navy, Manliness, and International Law, 1861–1865,” by Benjamin Roy
Wednesday, March 13, 2024, 7 p.m.

In the 19th century, U.S. naval officers on the high seas were frequently called on to interpret the law of nations. The Civil War complicated matters, launching junior officers into the most difficult legal situations they had yet encountered. Using four case studies, Benjamin Roy argues that manliness was a critical factor in officers’ decision-making, as they sought to glorify themselves, preserve their professional reputations, and project American power on an international stage. Roy is a doctoral student in history at the University of Georgia, and a 2023 recipient of a New England Regional Fellowship, which brought him to the Society to do research. Admission is free for New Hampshire Historical Society members; $5 for nonmembers. Register through Eventbrite.

Family Fun Day *FREE*
Saturday, March 16, 2024, 2 to 4 p.m.

An annual favorite! Bring the whole family to the Society for an afternoon of games, crafts, and storytelling. Explore the historic building, tour the exhibitions, test your knowledge of Granite State trivia, and make a New Hampshire-themed craft to take home. Introduce your kids to the special things that make New Hampshire a wonderful place to live! Family Fun Day is geared for families with kids ages 6 to 10, but all ages are welcome. This is a drop-in program, and registration is not required. All children must be accompanied by an adult. Admission is free thanks to a generous contribution from Concord Pediatric Dentistry.

Lecture: “Teddy Roosevelt’s Nobel Prize,” by Charles Doleac
Saturday, March 23, 2024, 2 p.m.

In August 1905, diplomats from Russia and Japan met in Portsmouth to negotiate an end to the Russo-Japanese War, which had been raging in the Far East for more than a year. Although few might remember this war today, it foreshadowed in many ways the modern warfare that came to characterize the 20th century. President Theodore Roosevelt orchestrated the talks that led to the signing of the Portsmouth Peace Treaty and was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his involvement. Join Chuck Doleac, the founder of the Portsmouth Peace Treaty Forum, to learn about this fascinating chapter in international diplomacy and the role New Hampshire played. Admission is free for New Hampshire Historical Society members; $7 for nonmembers. No registration required.

Granite State Stories *FREE*
Thursday, March 28, 2024, 6:30 p.m.

*Location: Hooksett Historical Society, 31 Mount St. Mary’s Way, Hooksett
For such a small state, New Hampshire has a remarkable history, full of interesting people, creative inventions, daring adventures, and astounding beauty. In honor of the New Hampshire Historical Society’s 200th anniversary, Society staffers are touring the state and sharing a collection of stories that capture the iconic spirit of New Hampshire, paired with images from the Society’s collections. The stories told at this event feature the Concord coach and Mount Washington. This talk is presented through the Humanities to Go program of New Hampshire Humanities, and admission in free.