Programs & Events Calendar

All programs and events are held at the New Hampshire Historical Society's headquarters building, located at 30 Park Street, Concord, unless otherwise noted.

Saturday, January 19, 2019, 2 p.m.
New Hampshire Heritage Lecture Series: The Story of the Libby Museum

A dentist, inventor, sculptor, poet, politician, and scientist, Dr. Henry Forrest Libby opened a museum in 1912 to display his large personal collection of natural history relics. Nestled between Mirror Lake and Lake Winnipesaukee, the museum was the lifelong dream of this remarkably eclectic man. After spending much of his adult life in dentistry, first as an itinerant dentist and then in a practice in Boston, Libby returned to his native Lakes Region when he was in his forties, determined to pursue his interest in the natural world. His accomplishments included the creation of calcined gypsum, a substance that was critical in preserving the specimens he had found. He later patented his discovery. Join Alana Albee, director of the Libby Museum and distant relation of Dr. Libby’s, to learn more about the story behind the Libby Museum of Wolfeboro.The New Hampshire Heritage Lecture Series highlights the stories behind the state’s many historic and cultural attractions.This program is included in the price of admission to the Society; New Hampshire Historical Society members are admitted for free.

Saturday, January 26, 2019, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
New Exhibition Opening: Signs of the Times

For more than a century the New Hampshire Historical Society has collected signs that have been part of the landscape and culture of the state of New Hampshire. Some have become iconic symbols of the Granite State, while others are so commonplace as to be barely noticed. Either way, signs have been ever-present throughout the state’s history, whether they are supporting a cause or a candidate, tempting us to buy something, or pointing us where we want to go. In the Society’s new exhibition, discover how signs can also serve as a window into our past and capture a moment from New Hampshire’s history. The exhibition is included in the price of admission to the Society; New Hampshire Historical Society members are admitted for free. Signs of the Times will be on view through October 2019.

Saturday, January 26, 2019, 1 to 3 p.m.
Family Fun Day

Bring the whole family to the New Hampshire Historical Society for an afternoon of games, crafts, and storytelling. Explore our historic building, tour our exhibits, test your knowledge of Granite State trivia, and make a New Hampshire-themed craft to take home. Introduce your kids to the special things that make New Hampshire a wonderful place to live. Family Fun Day is geared for families with kids ages 6 to 10, but all ages are welcome. Admission is $5 per family; New Hampshire Historical Society members are admitted for free.

Saturday, February 2, 2019, 2 p.m., 3 p.m., and 4 p.m.
Movie: The Concord Coach: A New Hampshire Legacy

Written and directed by Rebecca Howland, this documentary film celebrates the history of the Abbot-Downing Company and the iconic Concord coaches the company made in the 19th century. Concord coaches were among New Hampshire’s most famous exports—they were used all over the world, renowned for the relative comfort they offered passengers. Concord coaches helped settle the American West and the Australian continent. This 45-minute film, made with the cooperation of the Abbot-Downing Historical Society, uses interviews, photographs, paintings, and documents to tell the story. This program is included in the price of admission to the Society; New Hampshire Historical Society members are admitted for free.

Saturday, February 9, 2019, 1 p.m.
Curator’s Tour: Signs of the Times

Join Director of Collections and Exhibitions Wes Balla on a guided tour of the Society’s new exhibition, Signs of the Times. The tour is included in the price of admission to the Society; New Hampshire Historical Society members are admitted for free.

Saturday, February 9, 2019, 2 p.m. and 3 p.m.
Guided Gallery Tours

Enjoy a guided tour of the New Hampshire Historical Society’s historic Park Street building and exhibitions led by a member of the Society’s education or volunteer docent staff. Guided gallery tours are 45 minutes long and are appropriate for visitors of all ages. The tour is included in the price of admission to the Society; New Hampshire Historical Society members are admitted for free. Availability is on a first-come-first-served basis, and tours are capped at 12 people. To schedule a guided tour for an adult group of 12 or more people, see our group tours page or contact Assistant Director of Education and Public Programs Jenn Walton at jwalton@nhhistory.org or 603-856-0645. Youth and school groups of any size must schedule a guided visit in advance.

Friday, February 15, 2019, at noon
Guided Gallery Tour

Enjoy a guided tour of the New Hampshire Historical Society’s historic Park Street building and exhibitions led by a member of the Society’s education or volunteer docent staff. Guided gallery tours are 45 minutes long and are appropriate for visitors of all ages. The tour is included in the price of admission to the Society; New Hampshire Historical Society members are admitted for free. Availability is on a first-come-first-served basis, and tours are capped at 12 people. To schedule a guided tour for an adult group of 12 or more people, see our group tours page or contact Assistant Director of Education and Public Programs Jenn Walton at jwalton@nhhistory.org or 603-856-0645. Youth and school groups of any size must schedule a guided visit in advance.

Saturday, February 16, 2019, 2 p.m.
Lecture: Railroads and the Rise and Fall of the White Mountain Hotels, 1850–1960

The development of railroads in the White Mountain region of New Hampshire in the mid-19th century encouraged the growth of a string of grand hotels, promising recreational activities, clean fresh air, and dramatic mountain views—all of which drew travelers from near and far. For many decades this symbiotic relationship between the railroads and the hotels was a powerful economic, social, and cultural force in the region, until it was undermined, as quickly as it had developed, by a new and powerful force in American life: the automobile. Architect and transportation historian Frank J. “Jay” Barrett Jr. gives an overview of the related development of railroads and grand hotels in the White Mountains, and how the automobile age changed them both. This program is included in the price of admission to the Society; New Hampshire Historical Society members are admitted for free.

Saturday, February 23, 2019, 1 to 4 p.m.
Workshop: The Old House Speaks, or Researching Historic Homes in New Hampshire

Ever wonder about the history of your house and the people who lived there? This practical workshop helps researchers learn more about historic structures in New Hampshire, particularly the old homes that still stand in every Granite State community. Presenters Bill Veillette (executive director of the Northeast Document Conservation Center) and James L. Garvin (retired state architectural historian) demonstrate the variety of resources available to learn about New Hampshire houses, provide tips on how to approach research, and offer examples of how to “connect the dots” to create a compelling story of a historic house and its occupants, including deciphering the architectural clues found in every old house about the nature of its construction and the details of its physical features. This workshop is offered in association with the New Hampshire Preservation Alliance. The cost is $35 for New Hampshire Historical Society members or members of the New Hampshire Preservation Alliance and $50 for nonmembers. Register online at Eventbrite.com, mail in the registration form, or call 603-856-0621 to register by phone and pay with a credit card.

Monday, February 25, and Tuesday, February 26, 2019, 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Preservation 101 Workshop: Preservation Management and Collections Care

This two-day workshop, offered by the Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC), provides a basic introduction to the concepts and standards used to build an effective preservation program. The curriculum covers preservation policies, environmental and storage conditions, care and handling of collection materials, reformatting, emergency preparedness, and program assessment. The instructors will discuss realistic approaches to preservation at small- and medium-sized organizations, and small group work will encourage participants to discuss their own preservation goals together. The cost for this workshop is $150 for members of the New Hampshire Historical Society and $200 for nonmembers. Please note that registration is being handled by the NEDCC. To register, please visit NEDCC’s Current Training Programs page and scroll down to NH–Preservation Management and Collections Care Workshop. Members of the New Hampshire Historical Society should select the “Student” option to receive the member price. If you have any questions regarding registration, please contact NEDCC’s technology and events coordinator Kim O’Leary at koleary@nedcc.org or 978-470-1010 ex. 226. Registration deadline is February 18, 2019.

Saturday, March 9, 2019, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Genealogy Workshop: The Scots-Irish in New England

Three hundred years ago, in 1719, a group of sixteen Scots-Irish families established a settlement in Nutfield (later Londonderry), N.H. They were part of a wave of Scots-Irish immigration to New England that would bring thousands of people to the New World. In New Hampshire, the Londonderry settlement became a jumping-off point for what was essentially a Scots-Irish invasion in the eighteenth century. Scots-Irish settlers would become the largest minority group in the colony and would introduce the potato, first planted in Londonderry, to America. Join us for a day-long program with special guest speakers from the Ulster Historical Foundation from Belfast, Ireland, to learn more about the history of the Scots-Irish and conducting genealogical research on Scots-Irish families. Time will also be set aside for Q&A and for some tips on overcoming brick walls in your research. In addition, the Society will present for viewing—for one day only—the Shute Petition, which initiated the Scots-Irish exodus to New England. Space is limited, and registration is required. The cost is $75 for New Hampshire Historical Society members and $125 for nonmembers. Register online at Eventbrite.com, mail in the registration form, or call 603-856-0621 to register by phone and pay with a credit card.

Saturday, March 9, 2019, 2 p.m. and 3 p.m.
Guided Gallery Tours

Enjoy a guided tour of the New Hampshire Historical Society’s historic Park Street building and exhibitions led by a member of the Society’s education or volunteer docent staff. Guided gallery tours are 45 minutes long and are appropriate for visitors of all ages. The tour is included in the price of admission to the Society; New Hampshire Historical Society members are admitted for free. Availability is on a first-come-first-served basis, and tours are capped at 12 people. To schedule a guided tour for an adult group of 12 or more people, see our group tours page or contact Assistant Director of Education and Public Programs Jenn Walton at jwalton@nhhistory.org or 603-856-0645. Youth and school groups of any size must schedule a guided visit in advance.

Friday, March 15, 2019, at noon
Guided Gallery Tour

Enjoy a guided tour of the New Hampshire Historical Society’s historic Park Street building and exhibitions led by a member of the Society’s education or volunteer docent staff. Guided gallery tours are 45 minutes long and are appropriate for visitors of all ages. The tour is included in the price of admission to the Society; New Hampshire Historical Society members are admitted for free. Availability is on a first-come-first-served basis, and tours are capped at 12 people. To schedule a guided tour for an adult group of 12 or more people, see our group tours page or contact Assistant Director of Education and Public Programs Jenn Walton at jwalton@nhhistory.org or 603-856-0645. Youth and school groups of any size must schedule a guided visit in advance.

Saturday, March 16, 2019, 2 p.m.
New Hampshire Heritage Lecture Series: Preserving the Golden Age of Boats

With nearly 1,000 lakes within its borders, New Hampshire has a strong connection to boats, whether used for fishing, transportation, sport, or recreation. Native Americans and early colonists relied on canoes and plank boats, while Granite Staters in the 19th century took to steam and sail to navigate the lakes that dot the landscape. Many villages and towns were even oriented toward lakefronts for the convenience of boaters and fishermen, particularly after New Hampshire became a summer tourist destination. The advent of automobiles in the 20th century brought even more vacationers to New Hampshire’s waterways, leading to a golden age of hand-crafted, wooden boats built with elegance and equipped with engines that promised speed and maneuverability. Join Martha Cummings, executive director of the New Hampshire Boat Museum, to learn about the Granite State’s boating culture and the effort to preserve it on the shores of Lake Winnipesaukee. The New Hampshire Heritage Lecture Series highlights the stories behind the state’s many historic and cultural attractions.This program is included in the price of admission to the Society; New Hampshire Historical Society members are admitted for free.